Category Archives: nineteenth century

Abundantly Happy When They Can Afford An Athlone Hat

Do you remember this post I wrote about Swift’s 1720 pamphlet called the Proposal for the Universal Use of Irish Manufacture? Well, here is another quote from it: I think it needless to exhort the clergy to follow this good … Continue reading

Posted in athlone, caps, colour, cork, eighteenth century, felt, hand-carding, hats, ireland, jonathan swift, military, mills, nineteenth century, socks, stockings, USA | 11 Comments

To Drag Free Citizens to the Tenter-fields, and There to Torment Them

Possibly the only portrait of John Rocque – this upperclass man with his ‘way-wiser’ is drawn in his map of Middlesex – source. In 1754, John Rocque came to Dublin. In 1756, he produced the four-sheet Exact survey of the city and suburbs … Continue reading

Posted in dublin, dublin, eighteenth century, ireland, laws, nineteenth century, weaving | 6 Comments

“The Irish glover!” cried Mr. Hill, with a Look of Terror

Maria Edgeworth, 1768-1849, born in England but lived in Ireland since she was a young child. From the age of five, she lived at the family estate in Edgeworthstown, Co. Longford, with her twenty-one brothers and sisters. In 1804, Maria … Continue reading

Posted in gloves, leather, limerick, literature, nineteenth century, novels, personalities, short stories | 10 Comments

Crooning, and Moaning, and Drowsily Knitting

Photo source. Some time around 1853 (this is the date of the issue where he published a version in the Dublin University Magazine), probably in Dublin, John Francis Waller wrote this: A SPINNING-WHEEL SONG Mellow the moonlight to shine is … Continue reading

Posted in ireland, nineteenth century, personalities, poetry, spinning | 2 Comments

The Most An Attentive Spinster Could Earn

Photo source. The 1830s decline of the cotton, linen, and wool industries coincided with the Poor Law Commissions, a series of inquiries which were intended to shape the Poor Law Act of 1838. In Mayo, a Reverend Peter Ward told … Continue reading

Posted in cotton, hand-spinning, linen, mayo, nineteenth century, poor law inquiry, spinning, wool | Leave a comment

The Yankees Aren’t Coming – Important Limerick Heritage Site May Soon Be Gone With The Wind

-> Updates at the bottom of the post! <- In the mid-nineteenth century, most of the uniforms that were worn by British soldiers in the Crimean War, and Confederate soliders in the American Civil War, were made in Peter Tait’s … Continue reading

Posted in in the news, ireland, limerick, military, nineteenth century, personalities, topical, twentieth century, USA | Tagged , | 27 Comments

Something Very Different From The New York Shoddy

-> New information added at bottom of post! <- It was this very interesting blog post (“Clothing the Confederacy: Taits of Limerick”) from the fantastic site Irish in the American Civil War that alerted me to the existence of Tait jackets. … Continue reading

Posted in broadcloth, clothing, england, exhibitions, ireland, lace, limerick, linen, military, mills, nineteenth century, personalities, seamstresses, shirts, USA, wool, working women | 8 Comments

One Stiff Gown For Sunday

In 1765, Lady Arabella Denny founded the first Magdalen Asylum in Ireland, for Protestant ‘fallen women and penitent prostitutes’ in Lower Leeson Street in Dublin. A year previous to this she had been awarded the Freedom of the City of … Continue reading

Posted in caps, caps, clothing, cotton, dresses, dublin, handkerchiefs, lace, linen, neck handkerchiefs, nineteenth century, personalities, petticoats, serge, shawls, shoes, socks, stockings, wool | Leave a comment