Category Archives: ireland

Sallied Forth In Your Drawers

In October 1900, when asked his opinion on what ‘national costume’ should be adopted in a soon-to-be-independent Ireland, the Republican Pádraig Pearse had this to say: Frankly I should much prefer to see you arrayed in a kilt, although it may be … Continue reading

Posted in bog clothes, clothing, colour, dublin, ireland, kilts, knitting, laws, leather, men's clothing, national costume, ninth century, patrick pearse, personalities, school uniform, seventeenth century, stockings, trousers, twentieth century, weaving, wool | 12 Comments

Abundantly Happy When They Can Afford An Athlone Hat

Do you remember this post I wrote about Swift’s 1720 pamphlet called the Proposal for the Universal Use of Irish Manufacture? Well, here is another quote from it: I think it needless to exhort the clergy to follow this good … Continue reading

Posted in athlone, caps, colour, cork, eighteenth century, felt, hand-carding, hats, ireland, jonathan swift, military, mills, nineteenth century, socks, stockings, USA | 11 Comments

I Find My Soul Knit to These Poor Sheep

Elizabeth Bennis. Picture cropped from the cover of her edited diary, which you can buy very cheaply here. Elizabeth Patten was born in Limerick in 1725. The Pattens were an upper-middle-class Presbyterian family, headed by Isaac (d.1743). At the age of … Continue reading

Posted in cotton, eighteenth century, ireland, limerick, linen, personalities, quilting, religion, USA, waterford | Tagged , | 6 Comments

To Drag Free Citizens to the Tenter-fields, and There to Torment Them

Possibly the only portrait of John Rocque – this upperclass man with his ‘way-wiser’ is drawn in his map of Middlesex – source. In 1754, John Rocque came to Dublin. In 1756, he produced the four-sheet Exact survey of the city and suburbs … Continue reading

Posted in dublin, dublin, eighteenth century, ireland, laws, nineteenth century, weaving | 6 Comments

A Law to Cut Off All Our Weavers’ Fingers

Irish ten pound banknote, one of the series issued between 1976 and 1982, featuring Jonathan Swift and the Dublin City Council coat of arms. An economy-themed image of Swift FTW! In 1720, Jonathan Swift published a pamphlet called Proposal for the … Continue reading

Posted in cork, dublin, eighteenth century, england, ireland, jonathan swift, laws, linen, personalities, silk, wool | 5 Comments

Crooning, and Moaning, and Drowsily Knitting

Photo source. Some time around 1853 (this is the date of the issue where he published a version in the Dublin University Magazine), probably in Dublin, John Francis Waller wrote this: A SPINNING-WHEEL SONG Mellow the moonlight to shine is … Continue reading

Posted in ireland, nineteenth century, personalities, poetry, spinning | 2 Comments

The Most An Attentive Spinster Could Earn

Photo source. The 1830s decline of the cotton, linen, and wool industries coincided with the Poor Law Commissions, a series of inquiries which were intended to shape the Poor Law Act of 1838. In Mayo, a Reverend Peter Ward told … Continue reading

Posted in cotton, hand-spinning, linen, mayo, nineteenth century, poor law inquiry, spinning, wool | Leave a comment

The Junior Spinning Champion of Ireland and the Entente Cordiale

Front page of Le Petit Journal, 20 August 1905. On the 8th of April 1904, the United Kingdom and the French Republic signed the Entente Cordiale. This set of agreements essentially formalized the peace that had been between the countries … Continue reading

Posted in clothing, colour, england, exhibitions, hand-spinning, ireland, personalities, spinning, waterford | Leave a comment

The Yankees Aren’t Coming – Important Limerick Heritage Site May Soon Be Gone With The Wind

-> Updates at the bottom of the post! <- In the mid-nineteenth century, most of the uniforms that were worn by British soldiers in the Crimean War, and Confederate soliders in the American Civil War, were made in Peter Tait’s … Continue reading

Posted in in the news, ireland, limerick, military, nineteenth century, personalities, topical, twentieth century, USA | Tagged , | 27 Comments

Something Very Different From The New York Shoddy

-> New information added at bottom of post! <- It was this very interesting blog post (“Clothing the Confederacy: Taits of Limerick”) from the fantastic site Irish in the American Civil War that alerted me to the existence of Tait jackets. … Continue reading

Posted in broadcloth, clothing, england, exhibitions, ireland, lace, limerick, linen, military, mills, nineteenth century, personalities, seamstresses, shirts, USA, wool, working women | 8 Comments